Tag Archives: tomato

Chickpea flour scramble

1 Mar
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Chickpea flour scramble with tomatoes, on noochy toast.

 

You would never guess that the stuff that makes Indian pakoras so cripsy and holds together felafel would also make a creamy and satisfying scrambled egg substitute. The secret is to let the batter sit for a few hours. Not only does that sort out any lumps, but the flour particles soak up the water giving it a smoother consistency and texture. In my pre-vegan days I used to like my scrambled eggs quite soft, preferably with some tasty veggies added. I think this recipe is very reminiscent of that, but without being heavy or greasy and, more importantly, without any animal involvement.

 

Recipe (serves 1)

  • Quarter of a cup (60ml) of chickpea (gram) flour
  • 100ml of cold water
  • 1ts oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Optional: a bit of anything else you fancy, e.g. a chopped tomato, some courgette, or a couple of blocks of thawed frozen spinach.
  • Tea and toast, to serve.

Mix the chickpea flour and water together. Leave for at least two hours, preferably overnight. Don’t worry about any lumps, they will disappear on their own. The batter will probably end up quite thick, particularly at the bottom. Give it a quick stir before continuing.

Heat the oil in a small frying pan over a medium heat. If using something that needs to be cooked, e.g. tomato or courgette, fry this quickly first. Otherwise, mix whatever veg you’re adding into the batter.

Pour the batter into the frying pan. As it sets underneath and around the edges, turn with a spatula, as you would making scrambled eggs. Continue until it reaches the desired consistency, this will only take a couple of minutes at the most. Serve on toast with a nice cup of tea.

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Healing lentil and vegetable soup

30 Oct

At the start of every university term all sorts of bugs and diseases spread round campus. All the students come in from all over the world with their different germs, which they give to each other and the academic staff, who then pass them on to the admin staff. It’s now three weeks in to term and all of the support staff in my department are either just recovering or just coming down with something. In honour of everyone who works in a university, college, or school, and is feeling grotty right now, here is my get-well-soon soup. The lentils will give you enough protein to make all of those extra white blood cells you’ll need to fight the infection, and the vitamins from the veggies will boost your immune system so you can beat anything. It’s simple enough to make when you’re feeling at your absolute worst. On top of that, it’s both warm and comforting AND fresh and zingy all at the same time. I’ve used a mix of lentils for a varied texture, you could use just split peas to make it chunkier or just red lentil to be smoother. Here it is:

Chunky lentil and vegetable soup, the best cold remedy I know #vegan

A post shared by Mrs Veg (@mrs_veg) on

 

Recipe (serves four):

  • 1 tablespoon of oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped as chunky or as fine as you like
  • 1 stick of celery, also chopped as chunky or as fine as you like
  • 1 tablespoon mixed dried herbs
  • 100g yellow split peas or chana dal
  • 200g split red lentils
  • 1 litre vegetable stock
  • 1 x 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • A handful of chopped parsley
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a low heat. Sweat the onion and celery in the oil, covered, for about 10-15 minutes without colouring.

Add the herbs, split peas, lentils, stock, and tomatoes. Bring to a boil then simmer for 45 minutes, until the split peas are cooked through but still retain a little bit of bite.

Add the parsley and season to taste.

Curl up in your duvet and eat the soup out of the biggest mug you can find. Get well soon!

In my veg box this week – Halloween pumpkins (well, squashes) and late summer veg

29 Oct

Last Halloween we left it really late to buy a pumpkin to carve. We went to both of our local shops and neither had any left, so we ended up carving a swede instead. Historically in Britain and Ireland it used to be swedes and turnips that were carved at this time of year, but frankly it’s a lot more effort, doesn’t look as cool, and not nearly as tasty either. I’m really pleased to have three squashes to choose from this year. I bought the large one in the middle from the market at the weekend, the butternut and the little one on the right are from this week’s veg box. Whichever one gets carved on Friday will end up roasted or baked over the weekend, and end up in any of the following:

  • with pasta, greens, chilli, seeds, and a drizzle of balsamic vinegar glaze,
  • salad with lentils and loads of other seasonal veggies,
  • a creamy curry with chickpeas,
  • soup,
  • cakes or cookies.

This week I was thrilled to get some late summer courgettes and tomatoes. It has been such a long time since I had courgettes. For weeks on end I’d been saving a recipe for the next time I had courgettes (this one with fava beans if you’re interested) and I had actually given up all hope. so it’s a lovely surprise. I’ll enjoy them all the more knowing they’re almost certainly the last courgettes of the year.

Also received this week: onions, carrots, mushrooms, cabbage, grapes, bananas, oranges, apples.

“In my veg box this week…” is not intended as a product review, simply a description of some of the fruit and vegetables that are in season and what I like to do with them. I pay full price for my vegetable box and have no affiliation with the company that delivers them or any of their suppliers.

Puttanesca tabbouleh

4 Apr

This recipe is pretty low-key, but I just wanted to demonstrate the weird and wonderful dishes you can come up with when you just throw a bunch of ingredients in a bowl and see what happens. A good number of my recipes were invented on the hoof, my particular favourite being lentil curry with noodles AKA noo-dal. When I invented this salad, I needed an all-in-one carby veggie side dish to go with a quiche I was making (the recipe for which will follow in a couple of days). I came up with this and was really happy with the result. It’s tasty and tangy without dominating the plate.

A quick note on the recipe: It’s not a typo, I really do measure grains by volume in a measuring jug rather than by weighing it out, it’s so much easier.

Recipe (serves 2-3 as a side dish):

  • 100ml quinoa
  • 100ml bulgur wheat
  • 300ml boiling water
  • ½ ts salt
  • 4 tomatoes, chopped
  • Approx. 12 black olives, sliced
  • 1 tb capers, finely chopped
  • 1 tb lemon juice
  • 1 tb basil, finely chopped

Put the quinoa and bulgur wheat in a small saucepan over a hot heat. Allow to toast for a few seconds. Add the boiling water and salt, stir, bring to the boil and stir again. Boil for a couple of minutes, then turn the heat right down and cover the pan. Simmer for 10-15 minutes until all the water has been absorbed. The grains should be tender, and tiny white spirals will have started to pop out of the quinoa. Leave to cool.

Tip the cooled grains into a big bowl and fluff with a fork. Add the rest of the ingredients, mix well with a spoon or spatula and serve.

Crispy chickpea flour pancakes

2 Feb

I’d previously only ever used chickpea flour (aka gram flour or besan) for making onion bhajis or for holding together falafels, but I recently found out you can use it to make gorgeous crispy pancakes, somewhere between a thick flatbread and an omelette. They’re really quick and easy to make. In fact, even on a weekday morning when I have less than 10 minutes for my breakfast, I can make and eat one of these with time to spare. They’re totally delicious, and you can stuff them with or into whatever you fancy. How about filling one with fried mushrooms or tomatoes, or mashed avocado with tahini or hot sauce? They’re also the perfect size for stuffing into a tortilla or pitta bread, maybe with some beans and salsa, or some hummus.

Here it is, my new favourite breakfast:

Recipe (serves 1)

  • Quarter of a cup of chickpea flour
  • Quarter of a cup of cold water
  • A pinch each of ground cumin, salt, and pepper
  • A teaspoon or so of oil

Heat a small (15cm or so) frying pan over a medium-high heat.

Mix the chickpea flour and seasonings together in a small jug or bowl. Add the water and whisk quickly with a fork. Break up any large lumps but don’t worry too much about the smaller lumps.

Pour the oil into the hot pan and let it heat through. Add the batter, it will be thick but should easily spread to cover the bottom of the pan.

Fry the pancake for a couple of minutes each side until cooked through and crispy. Stuff, roll, and enjoy.

Harissa spiced roast vegetable pasta

17 Jun

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I’ve not posted very much over the last few weeks because I’ve been super busy at work, which completely saps my creativity. Things are calming down now, and I’ve finally got my cooking mojo back! I’ve been celebrating today with this simple spicy veggie pasta (recipe below).

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Recipe (serves 2)

  • A selection of veggies. I used onion, tomato, aubergine/eggplant, and courgette/zucchini. Other good options include squash, sweet potato, pepper or fennel.
  • Two tablespoons oil
  • 150g wholemeal pasta
  • 1 tablespoon harissa paste, or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon tomato puree

Preheat the oven to 200˚C. Chop the vegetables into roughly bite-sized pieces, transfer to a roasting tin, toss in the oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast until tender and starting to brown around the edges, around half an hour.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet. Drain and return to the pan. Add the harissa and tomato puree and the roasted vegetables. Mix well, adding a splash of water if it looks a bit dry.

Serve with some tasty protein, such as beans or marinated grilled tofu. We were feeling slightly less classy than that today, so we topped it with some vegetarian hot dogs. Yum.

Pesto pasta salad

19 May

I’m pretty good at making the effort to make a packed lunch to take to work, usually some salad or home-made soup. But no matter how disciplined you are, there will be some days when you find that (a) you don’t have the time (b) you’ve run out of food at home, or (c) a certain person has taken your lunchbox to work and accidentally left it there. I recently found myself in this position and decided to pop into the shop on the way to work to buy a nice healthy salad. The vegetarian choice wasn’t great that day and I ended up with this:

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It filled a hole, but it was a bit disappointing. It looked really good but tasted bland, didn’t have enough vegetables in it to justify calling it a salad and it was coated in an unhealthy slick some kind of green oil that claimed to be pesto dressing. I was left feeling I could have done a much better job of it myself.

So here is my version: healthier, tastier, cheaper, and not swimming in oil (recipe below).

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Serves 1

  • 75-100g wholewheat pasta (dry weight)
  • A good dollop of vegetarian or vegan pesto (good quality shop bought, or home-made)
  • A handful of something green and leafy, sliced (the shop version used spinach, I used chard, but anything green would be great)
  • A handful of cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 tablespoon pine nuts, toasted

Cook the pasta according to the instructions on the packet. Drain and leave to cool.

Steam the green veggies, leave to cool.

Combine the pasta, greens and pesto. Top with the tomatoes and pine nuts.

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