Growing vegetables without a garden

1 Jul

Home-grown vegetables taste infinitely better than those bought from a shop. Here’s my top three reasons why:

  • Freshness. The flavour of many vegetables degrades with every second that passes. Produce from a shop is at least a couple of days old, potentially weeks or months old. If you grow your own you can eat them within minutes.
  • Breeding. Commercially-grown vegetables are generally bred to be uniform in shape, size and colour, because sadly that’s what consumers and supermarkets want. If you grow your own, you can choose seeds and plants that are bred for flavour.
  • Ownership. If you put time and effort into creating something, it increases your appreciation of the end result.

As a big vegetable fan, it makes sense that I would have a go at growing my own, and getting the best, freshest veggies I can get my muddy little hands on. I’m not going to let a minor detail like not having a garden stop me. We did have an allotment for a couple of years, but it is too time-consuming if you work full time – I’ll leave that sort of thing to my Mum, who is retired and has two amazingly well-kept and productive plots.

There’s plenty of different things you can grow in containers, even in a small space. We have pots and tubs outside our door and outside our kitchen window. Here’s a selection of what I’m growing at the moment.

Broad beans and courgettes (zucchini). I’ve got these growing in two old recycling containers, with drainage holes drilled in the bottom. Courgettes are very greedy plants, so there’s a generous amount of chicken manure in there to help them along.

 


Potatoes. We’ve been growing spuds in a patio potato bag for a couple of years now, with great success. It’s really easy, you quarter-fill the bag with compost and nestle the chitted seed potatoes about halfway down. When green shoots start to show through, cover over with compost, repeat until it reaches the top of the bag (this takes a few weeks). As with spuds grown under the ground, as soon as either the fruit sets or the foliage starts to die back, the potatoes are ready. If in doubt, stick your hand in the compost like a lucky dip and grope around to see if you can find any potatoes. I’m growing pink fir apples this year, which are my favourite potatoes ever – they’re knobbly, waxy, earthy, nutty… heaven!

 
Strawberries. I’ve already mentioned that home-grown tastes better, but wow… strawberries are proof of this. If you’ve never tried a real home-grown strawberry you need to find some and do it. You will never go back to the bland, watery supermarket offerings again.

 

 

 

Herbs. It’s great to get home from work, think “oh, I need a bit of rosemary for my roast potatoes,” and to be able to snap off a sprig before I even get in the front door. Here we’ve got lavender on the left, and rosemary on the right. We’ve also grown thyme in the past. Any woody herbs should work well in a pot.

 

 
Garlic. If you want to grow something easy, garlic is a great way to start. You get a whole bulb of garlic (from a garden supplier, not a supermarket), break it into cloves and stick them in a bit of compost in a container. Six months or so later, each clove will have turned into a whole new bulb of garlic. Let the skins dry out and they’ll keep for months. Here you can see the scapes (flower stalks) are starting to grow. If you cut the scapes down, the resulting bulb will be much bigger, and you can cook with the scapes too, they’re a bit like spring onions or chunky garlic chives.

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7 Responses to “Growing vegetables without a garden”

  1. trixpin July 1, 2013 at 10:53 pm #

    I think if we could only grow one thing at home I would choose herbs – like you I love being able to just grab a few for any dish I happen to be cooking. I would miss our beetroots though …
    You’ve got an amazing selection, and it’s such an exciting time of year for them all isn’t it? The pink fir apples sound lovely.

    • mrsveg July 2, 2013 at 5:53 am #

      We have grown beetroots in pots before. Anything rooty works fine as long as you have a deep enough container for them.

  2. galleykitchengal July 9, 2013 at 2:16 pm #

    Hey there, Mrs. Veg! First, thanks so much for checking out my blog. 🙂 Secondly, this post couldn’t have come at a better time! I’m itching to grow veggies and fruit, and currently have ZERO garden space. I am, however, moving to a house with a lovely little garden plot at my disposal. I’ll keep you posted with questions when I start growing!

    • mrsveg July 9, 2013 at 2:21 pm #

      Thanks for your comment. I’m not an expert but if you have any questions please feel free to post them. Good luck!

  3. Penniless Veggie August 7, 2013 at 12:26 pm #

    I must grow garlic this year (I presume Autumn would be OK?) we get through so much of the stuff!

    • mrsveg August 7, 2013 at 5:45 pm #

      Home grown garlic is amazing, and it’s pretty high yielding. One bulb of garlic can turn into 10+ brand new bulbs. According to my favourite gardening book you need to plant it in late autumn or early spring, and it will be ready at some point in the summer. We’ve just harvested ours at the weekend and it’s great!

      • Penniless Veggie August 7, 2013 at 6:07 pm #

        Thanks for the tip! I will get it sorted this autumn, seems so daft to keep buying stuff that’s so simple to grow.

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